Here's a place for stuff I find on the internet. Sometimes there will be funny things, sexy things, insightful things (rarely) and political things.

Just to be safe, consider this to be NSFW at all times, and especially on days that start with T.

 

maxsterism:

i-said-id-never-let-you-go:

dorranxskara:

righteouskungfu:

iwishiwroteharrypotter:

thecolorplaid:

allihearisradiogaga:

bangarangn1tram:

iamtonysexual:

sobasicallysherlock:

inthedeereyes:






MEN OF TUMBLR I LOVE YOU










Oh who, meeee???




omg reblog it yesterday and there were only two pictures
guys what have you done in one day? D:

Shall we just give it up for the guys of tumblr seriously?


Oh my! <3

maxsterism:

i-said-id-never-let-you-go:

dorranxskara:

righteouskungfu:

iwishiwroteharrypotter:

thecolorplaid:

allihearisradiogaga:

bangarangn1tram:

iamtonysexual:

sobasicallysherlock:

inthedeereyes:

image

image

MEN OF TUMBLR I LOVE YOU

image

image

image

image

Oh who, meeee???

image

image

omg reblog it yesterday and there were only two pictures

guys what have you done in one day? D:

Shall we just give it up for the guys of tumblr seriously?

image

Oh my! <3

(Source: myfandom-needsme)

As children, we fear the dark. Anything might be out. here. The unknown troubles us. Ironically, it is our fate to live in the dark. This unexpected finding of science is only about three centuries old. Head out from the Earth in any direction you choose, and—after an initial flash of blue and a longer wait while the Sun fades—you are surrounded by blackness, punctuated only here and there by the faint and distant stars. Even after we are grown, the darkness retains its power to frighten us. And so there are those who say we should not inquire too closely into who else might be living in that darkness. Better not to know, they say. There are 400 billion stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Of this immense multitude, could it be that our humdrum Sun is the only one with an inhabited planet? Maybe. Maybe the origin of life or intelligence is exceedingly improbable. Or maybe civilizations arise all the time, but wipe themselves out as soon as they are able. Or, here and there, peppered across space, orbiting other suns, maybe there are worlds something like our own, on which other beings gaze up and wonder as we do about who else lives in the dark…Life is a comparative rarity. You can survey dozens of worlds and find that on only one of them does life arise and evolve and persist… If we humans ever go to these worlds, then, it will be because a nation or a consortium of them believes it to be to its advantage—or to the advantage of the human species… In our time we’ve crossed the Solar System and sent four ships to the stars… But we continue to search for inhabitants. We can’t help it. Life looks for life.

Carl Sagan (via atomstargazer)

martinekenblog:

“The Red Berries”, Ballpoint Pen and Ink, 19.5 in x 13.75 in, 2013 by

LaurenMarxArtwork

More illustrations by LaurenMarxArtwork on Deviantart

Follow Martineken Blog on Facebook

apuleiaprimilla:

The urn contained the ashes of Vernasia Cyclas, and was commissioned by her husband Vitalis who was a freed slave working in the imperial household as a scribe. Vernasia, the inscription informs us, died at the age of twenty seven and was an excellent wife. The front of the urn is framed by two tall torches and below the inscribed panel are Vitalis and Vernasia, their right hands joined as during the wedding ceremony. 
It reads: Vernasiae / Cycladi / coniugi optimae / vix(it) ann(os) XXVII / Vitalis Aug(usti) l(ibertus) / scrib(a) cub(iculariorum) / f(idelissimae) a(mantissimae) p(ientissimae)“Vitalis, freedman and Private Secretary of the Emperor [dedicated this] to Vernasia Cyclas his excellent wife [who] lived for twenty seven years.To this most faithful, loving and devoted woman.”1st century, from Rome© The Trustees of the British Museum, London

apuleiaprimilla:

The urn contained the ashes of Vernasia Cyclas, and was commissioned by her husband Vitalis who was a freed slave working in the imperial household as a scribe. Vernasia, the inscription informs us, died at the age of twenty seven and was an excellent wife. The front of the urn is framed by two tall torches and below the inscribed panel are Vitalis and Vernasia, their right hands joined as during the wedding ceremony. 

It reads: Vernasiae / Cycladi / coniugi optimae / vix(it) ann(os) XXVII / Vitalis Aug(usti) l(ibertus) / scrib(a) cub(iculariorum) / f(idelissimae) a(mantissimae) p(ientissimae)

“Vitalis, freedman and Private Secretary of the Emperor [dedicated this] to Vernasia Cyclas his excellent wife [who] lived for twenty seven years.
To this most faithful, loving and devoted woman.”

1st century, from Rome

© The Trustees of the British Museum, London

sciencesoup:

Interplanetary Superhighway
For thousands of years, navigators have used the stars to find their way, but in recent years, GPS has all but eliminated the challenge of navigating the Earth’s surface. Today’s navigational problems are in space—and JPL research scientist Martin Lo has conceived an interesting and mathematically viable idea for navigating amongst the planets: an ‘Interplanetary Superhighway.’ Most missions take advantage of the way gravity speeds up a spacecraft as it swings by a planet or moon, but Lo’s idea takes advantage of something else—Lagrange points, which are the points between celestial objects where their gravitational pull is cancelled out. These points leave paths of ‘gravity voids’ through which spacecraft can travel without having to fight the pull of gravity, so just a tiny expenditure of energy would propel the craft, slashing the amount of fuel it needs to move. The Earth-Moon system has five Lagrange points, which connect to similar ones between other planets and moons, creating subtle pathways that link the solar system—imagine a network of virtual tubes, snaking through space like a freeway but constantly shifting as the planets orbit the sun. Even though travelling along these would be slower than more direct routes, and they do not guarantee easy access to every part of the solar system, this potential Interplanetary Superhighway requires minimal energy and therefore minimal fuel—a huge advantage for future unmanned deep-space missions.

sciencesoup:

Interplanetary Superhighway

For thousands of years, navigators have used the stars to find their way, but in recent years, GPS has all but eliminated the challenge of navigating the Earth’s surface. Today’s navigational problems are in space—and JPL research scientist Martin Lo has conceived an interesting and mathematically viable idea for navigating amongst the planets: an ‘Interplanetary Superhighway.’ Most missions take advantage of the way gravity speeds up a spacecraft as it swings by a planet or moon, but Lo’s idea takes advantage of something else—Lagrange points, which are the points between celestial objects where their gravitational pull is cancelled out. These points leave paths of ‘gravity voids’ through which spacecraft can travel without having to fight the pull of gravity, so just a tiny expenditure of energy would propel the craft, slashing the amount of fuel it needs to move. The Earth-Moon system has five Lagrange points, which connect to similar ones between other planets and moons, creating subtle pathways that link the solar system—imagine a network of virtual tubes, snaking through space like a freeway but constantly shifting as the planets orbit the sun. Even though travelling along these would be slower than more direct routes, and they do not guarantee easy access to every part of the solar system, this potential Interplanetary Superhighway requires minimal energy and therefore minimal fuel—a huge advantage for future unmanned deep-space missions.